Who is Keir Starmer trying to impress with his New Leadership?

Rupert Murdoch is one of the most influential and powerful men in global politics. Many would go as far as to call him a Kingmaker, and they’d be right. When it comes to British politics, receiving the endorsement of his newspapers (The Times & The Sun) counts for an awful lot.

When Tony Blair was elected as Labour Leader in 1994, he and his team of media-savvy advisers very quickly got to grips with what needed to change within their party so they could become an election-winning machine. It was a case of “Out with the Old” and “In with the New (Labour)”.

Before Blair’s leadership, Labour had been a party hostile to the likes of Murdoch and big corporations. But under Blair, the Labour Party learnt how to be accepting of Capitalism and they embraced a new way of thinking about politics and ideology. 

They were no longer the party which opposed Thatcher’s Capitalist ideals. Instead, they welcomed her legacy and sought to carry on championing businesses and freedom rather than seeking to push a socialist agenda. 

Blair knew he had to ditch all the ”far-left” nonsense. Otherwise, the electorate wouldn’t be swaying from the Tories. Likewise, Murdoch was also getting fed-up with John Major’s Government. Rupert was becoming increasingly impatient over John Major’s inability to push forward policy and implement the type of change that Rupert wanted to see. 

And if there is one thing politicians around the world have learnt is that if you want the top job, then don’t upset Rupert. Blair knew precisely that, and as Rupert Murdoch changed the political allegiance of The Sun from Tory to Labour, that was when Tony Blair realised that victory was almost inevitable. 

Fast-forward twenty years, the Tories are in power, and the Labour Party, having just got rid of Jeremy Corbyn and elected Sir Keir Starmer, are now attempting to repeat the same makeover that Blair did two decades ago. 

Keir Starmer’s motto, Under New Management/Under New Leadership, is a blatant attempt at trying to not just show the electorate they are the right party for Government. But, also demonstrate to Rupert Murdoch they are worthy of his backing. 

Ed Davey’s fight for the future of Liberalism

They were the results of a contest that nobody really cared about. A party that since 2015 has seemed pretty aimless and lacking in purpose. For the last five years, the Liberal Democrats have been without strong leadership. They’ve lacked a clear vision and time and time again have failed to grasp the attention of the electorate. 

The Lib Dems are supposedly the party of the centre-ground, and after five years of tribalism and populism on the right and left of politics, you would have thought there was an appetite for centrism. Well, there is, but not necessarily the type of centrism the Lib Dems are dishing up. 

No matter who takes charge of this sinking ship, they will always struggle to shake off the public perception of them being the party of broken promises. As we are reminded time and time again, the Lib Dems are of course the party, that when in government with the Tories failed to abolish tuition fees, cap bankers bonuses, not increase the rate of VAT, as well as add 3,000 extra police officers on the streets and create 100,000 jobs

The only hope for the Liberal Democrats going forward is for them to abandon the sinking ship, grab the nearest lifeboats, sail their members away from what was the Liberal Democrats and reach out to fellow centrists (former Tory MPs and New Labourite MPs). In the hope of one day being able to re-form The Liberal Party. 

If Ed Davey is telling his party, they need “to wake up and smell the coffee” well then maybe he should stop buying the same brand of cheap coffee, that nobody likes the taste of, and instead focus his energy on building a new Liberal organisation. The TIGers, Change UK, Renew UK, and even Rory Stewart attempted to take London by storm with his British ”En Marche!” movement

No centrist, since Blair, has been able to capture the nation’s attention. And considering he was also the same man who drove people away from the idea of voting for a similar figure, trust in centrism may take some time to restore before Britain is ready to vote Liberal again. 

But that means Sir Ed Davey must be ready to take the fight to Boris and Keir. Both leaders claim to be more centrist/liberal than their predecessors, but their downfall will always be their core membership being on the right and left of the spectrum. Whereas Davey has the upper hand of already having a core-centrist membership to start building a new/refreshed movement on.  

In his acceptance speech, he said he would rebuild the party. He is seeking to replace Brexit as the party’s key theme and focus on support for carers and investment in the green economy.

This may be a more effective strategy, but with only a handful of MP’s and not much support in the polls, the new leader is facing the most significant challenge any Lib Dem leader has had to face.

Does Keir Starmer deserve his lead???

Recent polling has suggested the public mood is slowly shifting from people wanting the divisive and tribal Tories, to opting for a less bolshy administration.

According to a survey by YouGov for The Times, the Labour leader, Keir Starmer, would do a better job than Boris Johnson of running the country. Thirty-four percent of those polled said Sir Keir would be the best Prime Minister, compared to 32 percent backing Mr Johnson.

Sir Keir has already impressed critics by showing how tough he can be with members of his own party over issues like anti-Semitism. This was something Rebecca Long-Bailey was on the receiving end of, after she got sacked from her role as Shadow Education Secretary for sharing an article containing an anti-Semitic conspiracy theory.

Unite’s General Secretary, Len McCluskey, was very vocal about this decision, calling on the Labour leader not to shut out and neglect the ‘left’ in the party. He’s also made countless threats to Sir Keir by threatening to defund Labour, saying the leader should not take Unite’s Labour funding for granted.

Yet, after four election losses on the Trot, Sir Keir knows that when it comes to the next election, Labour will need to slowly rid their party of any anti-Semites and corrosive Momentum members. They, for the last few years, have turned their party into an unelectable mess and a laughing stock.

But all this newfound support from the electorate isn’t because of the Labour leader’s strength against the far-left in his party. In fact, it’s got nothing to do with Starmer’s leadership at all. The truth is, he hasn’t actually done anything. The only reason Sir Keir has experienced such a surge is that Johnson’s grading gaffe has made him so unpopular.

At this point in time, the only way Labour could possibly win the next election will not be down to Starmer’s stellar leadership or any ground-breaking policy initiatives, but because the Tories have been making far too many mistakes.